What You Receive When You Join Basecamp InQb8r

Applicants can join for free by submitting the application below.

My Name is Ed Soehnel and I’ve been an entrepreneur all my life, starting my first company in College when I was 18 years old.  Since then, I have sold one,  built another 6, crashed 2, and worked on so many other ideas that I have lost count. I am the founder of Basecamp InQb8r.

Over the years, I kept seeing the same sets of problems with consumer goods startups:

  1.  They lack knowledge and experience, so they make mistakes and burn precious cash and time, which dramatically increases the chances of failure;
  2. There are incubators and accelerators from which to apply to get knowledge and capital, but most of these programs are geographically focused, requiring the startup to move, and there is on average only a 3% acceptance rate into them, which means most startups miss out on getting valuable knowledge;
  3. Hiring consultants is expensive and burns precious cash that a startup needs to grow.

As a result, I set out to create Basecamp InQb8r to help solve these problems, with the following components:

University

University teaches the comprehensive basics to develop, launch and grow a consumer goods company, while also staying current with industry and marketplace practices.

It contains content, methodologies, processes, tools, spreadsheets, diagrams, resource lists, research, data and software, organized to take a startup from idea to $50 million in annual sales.

Regardless of whether you want to stay small and private or grow large with investor participation, University teaches the fundamentals that matter regardless of size.

University is the fastest, cheapest and most efficient way for you to come up to speed fast on what you need to do, how you need to do it, and a general plan you can follow.  It compresses my decades of consumer goods startup experience so you don’t have to spend years learning and making the same mistakes I did. 

And, I keep it updated.  I built University in such a way for me to use it daily myself and amend it as needed to stay current. It is not like a business book that gets written and may become outdated within 6-months.

Curriculum

Basecamp InQb8r University is a knowledgebase of content, methodologies, processes, tools, spreadsheets, diagrams, resource lists, research, data and software, organized to take a startup from idea to $50 million in annual sales.  Regardless of whether you want to stay small and private or grow large with investor participation, University teaches the fundamentals that matter regardless of size. It includes:

  • The Growth Stack, which is a road map for developing, launching and growing a consumer goods company through methods that can lead to more sales – faster – and can make a company and its products more appealing to consumers, resellers and investors, with less risk.
  • The Lean & Agile Framework, which is the operating manual to help support executing on the Growth Stack. It is organized into eight core sections.  There are more than 40 tools in the forms of models, spreadsheets, standard operating procedures and diagrams

The goal for incubator members is to build into their companies the following top line fundamentals.  If entrepreneurs can successfully do all five, they are more likely to be successful. Basecamp InQb8r’s content is designed to support these five elements.

  1. Capture customer’s attention. Your product or something about your company has a “WOW” factor that grabs consumers quickly. You solve a problem, pain or satisfy a customer’s desire in a noticeable way.
  2. Defensible. You have a patent or the potential for a patent, your product is hard to copy, you have a proprietary or close to proprietary way of selling and distributing, or anything else about your company that makes you unique that customers desire which is hard to copy or duplicate.
  3. Repeat purchasers. You are not constantly having to replace lost customers with new ones.
  4. Scales up. You can grow to serve a lot of customers, which by nature defines a typical consumer goods company, but further means that the supply chain is not overly fragile and there are economies of scale gained with growth.
  5. Profitable at a 20% net margin that is sustainable. This means you probably have good cost control in your cost of goods sold, your marketing acquisition costs and your operating expenses. Sustainability comes not just from mastering the above four fundamentals, but your products and operations minimize or even reverse resource depletion and minimize or offset environmental impacts.

We see so many startups and product launches that waste money, time or outright fail because they use the wrong growth strategy.

In our experience, the Growth Stack requires the least amount of investment and the least amount of risk, and has the potential to provide much faster, more robust and sustainable growth.

It will work for any size company. If you want to stay small, it will work, if you want to grow big, it will work.

Learn three key things:

  1. How to have very profitable products and without having to sell a lot;
  2. How to get FREE marketing, so you can run a lot of it;
  3. How to get resellers and retailers and investors to chase you, not the other way around

Before starting your company, achieve alignment and fit between your goals, brand pillars, category/product selection and target market.

Here is what is covered in this section:

How to determine your interest, passions and talents and why these should be aligned with your business;

Why it is important to have deep joy in building your company and how to make sure you build that into your company;

A list of resources and tools to help you determine your interest, passions and talents;

The difference between interests, passions and talents and what stays the same and what changes;

How to come up with the best business idea for you;

Why you should work on your strengths and not your weaknesses, but when it is important to work on your weaknesses;

What is a backstory and why it is important for your business idea;

Examples of backstories that you can find to learn from;

What is a company vision;

What is a company mission or values;

What is company culture;

What are goals;

How vision, mission, values/culture and goals fit together;

How to align your interest, passions and talents with your company vision, mission/values and culture;

What are customer personas;

Why it is important to think about your target market in terms of customer personas;

What are brand pillars, why they are important and how to develop them;

One way to stand out in your business that you build into your brand pillars;

How to determine the viability of your business idea;

Characteristics for a great product (or business idea)

Which are you: product centric, marketing centric, sales centric and what are the differences and how do they impact your growth strategy;

What are the predominant marketing influencing factors, how are they different and why timing of their use is important;

What are the major sales models for consumer goods, how are they different, what is their relative cost to execute and risk factors;

Which sales models might you pick and why;

The major consumer goods growth strategies and why the framework emphasizes certain ones over others;

Why having a lot of cash is often your most dangerous resource that can kill your company;

How to set goals and how they fit into your business planning process;

What is a scorecard and how to start using this tool;

Why it is important to measure, track and report;

How having to make fewer decisions can make you more successful;

How to manage strategic, tactical and day-to-day distractions in growing your company;

A model for analyzing risk and how to minimize it;

What is strategic alignment in your company;

Why you need strategic alignment;

When I ask people who are successful what is the one thing that they owe to their success, most say it comes down to this one thing.

Implement the right technology and processes so that growth is easier to manage and scale.

Here is what is covered in this section:

Why data and information is power;

Goals for the technology I use;

My systems, processes and technology for productivity;

What are dashboards and KPIs;

Key KPIs I like;

Supply chain tools I use;

Production tools I use;

Logistics/Shipping-Warehouse/Inventory tools I use;

My main website infrastructure platforms I use and why;

WordPress plugins I use;

Woocommerce add-ons I use;

My website customizations and why I developed them;

My ecommerce sales funnel, why I developed it, and how the rules engine works to power it;

The email list infrastructure I use;

The social media tools I use;

The web analytics tools I use;

Systems I no longer use and why;

The database I use and why I developed it;

Other database alternatives;

Sales tools I use;

Customer service tools I use;

Finance tools I use;

What I use to run my finance and accounting;

Systems to manage contractors and human resources;

My technology costs.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Business Organizer;

Growth Plan & Timeline;

Calendars;

Task List;

Dashboard-KPIs-Metrics;

Email SOP;

Website Development/Changes SOP;

Consumer Product Ecommerce Sales Funnel;

Database SOP;

Consumer Product Customer-Ecommerce-Marketing Database;

System Costs;

Operations Database.

Develop “WOW” products that capture attention, perform competitive research, determine positioning, overcome sales objections, determine value propositions and document risks

Here is what is covered in this section:

How to develop products in context of value ladders and sales funnels;

How to develop products for a traditional reseller/retail approach;

What is rapid-prototyping and why you need to develop products this way;

What are WOW products and why you need them;

What things cause people to talk about and share;

Classic direct response marketing elements for blockbuster products;

Ten elements that make up WOW;

WOW products can be a combination of things;

A WOW product is relative to the target market;

Validate the existence of buyers;

Passive Consumer Voice Mining;

Use neuromarketing in place of surveys;

How to research and secure names for your company and products;

Resources for names keyword & search phrases;

Why I am not a fan of traditional surveys;

Tools if you want to conduct surveys;

Key industry research questions to answer;

Key competitor research questions to answer;

Competitor research tools to use;

Key reseller/retail research questions to answer;

Key questions to help determine your competitive advantages;

Key questions to help determine your dream customers;

How to improve customer personas with affinities research;

How to determine your product positioning;

How to document sales objections;

Document risks with your product;

Document constraints to working with your product, category and industry;

Get UPC and GTIN numbers.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Specifications & Price List.

Pricing, cost of goods sold (COGS), accounting, budgeting, forecasting, fundraising and all things finance-related

Here is what is covered in this section:

The ultimate goal in any company is to acquire AND retain customers where costs to acquire and retain are less than expenses, which leads to profits;

Lay out best practices in accounting and finance that will tell the business what activities are most successful for acquiring and retaining customers, so the business can do more of that, and where they are less successful (or not at all), and stop doing that;

The flow of money and key financial metrics that underpin the use of direct marketing to sell products;

The main profit and loss buckets;

The million dollar question: how much to spend on marketing & sales;

Why the common rule of thumb on marketing spend is wrong;

What is marketing efficiency and why do you want it;

Where to obtain the key data for building the key financial models;

The right way to track and categorize expenses;

Why you want to separate investment costs from all other costs in the profit and loss statement;

What is cost of goods sold (COGS) and what expenses make up this bucket;

The important questions to consider in determining and managing COGS;

A rule of thumb for COGS;

How to create profit & loss statements by product and sales channel and why you want to do that;

How to determine marketing costs by product and sales channel and why you want to do that;

How to determine return on ad spend (ROAS) contribution margin, and return on investment (ROI) and how to use these ratios;

How to determine average customer value and why you want to know that;

How to determine average order value in context of a product sales funnel and why you want to know that;

How to drill down and determine your suggested retail price (MSRP);

How to eliminate channel conflict in pricing;

How to set pricing based on profitability goals;

How to set pricing in context of discounts and special offers;

The right way to build a sales forecast model that is based not just on end consumer sales, but what you ship out;

How to use a resellers target weeks on hand inventory to manage your sales forecast;

How to use prior year data to help in your sales forecasting;

How to use promotions and seasonal spikes to help in your sales forecasting;

How to create profit & loss statements with actual results and forecasted numbers;

Why you want to avoid equity fundraising for your company;

The key questions your finances need to answer with respect to your company;

How to set marketing spend based on specific growth strategies;

Why sell direct-to-consumer and not use resellers;

Pricing after you have acquired a customer;

How to increase revenue;

A case for using resellers before direct-to-consumer.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Accounting General Ledger;

Simulation P&L;

Traffic & Funnel Model;

SRP Pricing Model;

Sales Forecast Model;

Standard Ownership/Fundraising Capitalization Model;

Operations Database.

Supply chain, production, logistics and warehousing

Here is what is covered in this section:

How production and logistics is entirely driven off of your inventory management tool;

The different subsections of production and logistics and how to think about them in sequence;

What happens to finished goods in context of direct-to-consumer shipments and retail shipments and why;

What you need to do daily to manage your inventory;

What you need to do weekly to manage your inventory;

Additional items related to production and logistics to think through;

Supply Chain Risk Management Tool.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Product Production Log;

Operations Database.

Organize marketing so you have a detailed framework to know what kind of marketing to create, why, when to deploy it, and where to deploy it.

Here is what is covered in this section:

Why you need a framework for marketing;

The one secret to success in marketing;

Why marketing is about trust and relationship;

The 1000 true fans concept and how it can work in growing your company;

The two broad categories of marketing and why you need to focus on both;

Hot vs warm vs cold prospects and how to market to them;

Direct marketing vs brand marketing vs grass roots marketing;

Paid vs owned vs earned media;

Awareness vs engagement vs conversion;

Active vs passive media;

How to organize the above marketing concepts into a framework to know what kind of marketing to create, why, when to deploy it, and where to deploy it;

How to get marketing to pay for itself (so you can spend a lot on it);

How to test marketing before you invest in more marketing;

How to visually organize the marketing framework into a useful tool;

Understanding basic and advanced concepts in behavior and psychology for use in marketing;

What is brand identity and how to create it for your products and company;

Understanding marketing creative & copy;

Using storytelling to market your products;

Understanding value propositions;

Product pricing from a financial vs marketing context;

Building landing pages, funnels, using conversion rate optimization (CRO) and UX/UI;

Basic analytics tools you want to have in place to capture marketing data;

Targeting your marketing to behaviors vs interests;

Marketing strategy vs tactics vs ideas;  what is the difference and why;

How to keep track of your marketing ideas;

Marketing channels & tactics list;

Diagnose marketing failures.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Blog Posts and Social Posting SOP;

Business Organizer;

UTM Formula Tool;

Marketing Campaigns & Ideas Tracking Tool;

Marketing Channels List.

Customer support cost and comparison model

Sell through retailers, distributors, drop shippers, affiliates and others

Here is what is covered in this section:

What does sales do?

A product vs a product line;

How the category buyer sees your product;

Why your product may not be of interest to a category buyer;

Questions you need to answer before selling through resellers;

Why you have to forecast tradespend and reseller ROI ahead of time;

What is pricing from financial and marketplace contexts;

How to account for tradespend in a P&L;

How to look at SRP, wholesale cost, product size by channel, retailer margin and distributor pricing in an example;

One method for determining channel margins when you are not able to talk with industry insiders;

How to get into resellers and grow;

A process and checklist to sell to resellers;

Working with brokers;

How to handle annual reviews with resellers;

What is sales operations what does it do and why;

SOP for setting up new resellers;

Purchase order receiving and fulfillment SOP;

What is merchandising and how to do it;

What is account marketing and how to do it;

The best way to manage forecasting to keep you sane;

A complete diagram on all the components and activities of a sales department and how they interact;

List of qualified market of retailers for food, outdoor, home & garden and general merchandise, and toy & educational products.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Retail Terms Sheet And Setup Checklist;

Simplified Retailer ROI Model;

Complex Retailer ROI Model;

Model and sequence determining margins;

New Account Setup Checklist;

Master Account Summary Tool;

Daily Ship vs. Open Tool;

New Reseller Setup SOP;

Post-reseller account setup SOP;

Purchase order receiving and fulfillment SOP;

Specifics on doing business with Costco;

Graphical layout of a Sales Department.

This section is a basic high level checklist for support areas to build out the company

Here is what is covered in this section:

Human Resources;

Legal;

Insurance;

Regulatory;

Finance;

Facilities.

Specific models and tools I have created for this section:

Operations Database.

Knowledge Boards

The Knowledge Boards are where I post current strategies and tactics working in the marketplace as well as other key news and trends.

I do lots of reading, research and am interfacing with industry contacts all the time, not to mention the one-on-one work I do with startups through mentoring, advising and consulting.  Anything relevant I post here.

Calendar With Open-Office Hours

I hold a few open-office sessions every month where InQb8r members can pop in to ask specific questions or get help for their particular situation.

The calendar has those dates and times.

Connecting and interacting with members is really important to me as I find great satisfaction helping others and learning what they are doing.

Sometimes no matter what you learn through reading or research, you just need to be able to quickly access an expert to check your thinking or get unstuck about something.

Basecamp InQb8r Datasets

The datasets available are as follows:

  1. The Company Dataset collects different qualitative and quantitative data points on companies.  The purpose of the dataset is to allow Basecamp InQb8r members to learn from companies in the dataset to follow and model in their own company.
  2. The External Dataset are data sources or specific datasets either publicly available or for purchase that may be useful for a consumer goods company. The purpose of this dataset is to serve as a directory of potentially useful data sources that consumer goods companies can use to help grow.
  3. The Workflows Dataset includes examples of or actual workflows used in data science projects for a consumer goods company.  The purpose of this dataset is to give examples of data analysis and data science workflows that a consumer goods company can model to use in their company.
  4. The Data Science Use Cases Dataset includes generic examples and specific examples used by companies.  The purpose of the dataset is to allow Basecamp InQb8r members to learn from companies in the dataset to follow and model in their own company.
  5. The Resources Dataset includes resources we find for startups and growing consumer goods companies, including education/knowledgebases, mentors/advisors, networking/events/tradeshows, accelerators, incubators, seed/angel investors, venture capital/private equity investors, lenders, crowdfunding, M&A and consolidators.
  6. The Vendor Dataset includes vendors with offerings that may be helpful for growing a consumer goods company.  Those on this list have more unique and differentiated offerings.  This list is skewed towards vendors with data science related products and services.
  7. The Distribution Dataset  includes distribution companies , including platforms, resellers, retail, wholesalers, and affiliates.

Funding

The goal for incubator members is to build into their companies the following top line fundamentals.  If entrepreneurs can successfully do all five, they are more likely to be successful.  Basecamp InQb8r’s content is designed to support these five elements.

  1. Capture customer’s attention. Your product or something about your company has a “WOW” factor that grabs consumers quickly. You solve a problem, pain or satisfy a customer’s desire in a noticeable way.  Think cheaper, faster, better, and/or more convenient than competing products.
  2. Defensible– can include any of the following:
    1. you have a patent or the potential for a patent;
    2. your product is hard to copy;
    3. you have a proprietary or close to proprietary way of selling and distributing;
    4. you collect data on your customers that is unique and which no other company can collect or is very hard to do so;
    5. or, anything else about your company that makes you unique that customers desire which is hard to copy or duplicate.
  3. Repeat purchasers. You are not constantly having to replace lost customers with new ones.
  4. Scales up. You can grow to serve a lot of customers, which by nature defines a typical consumer goods company that gains economies of scale with growth, but further means that the supply chain is not overly fragile. Your supply chain and production are closer to your customers, which means doing all possible to source supply and produce in the same country that you sell.
  5. Profitable at a 20% net margin that is sustainable. Sustainable means several things:
    1. You have good cost control in your cost of goods sold, your marketing acquisition costs and your operating expenses;
    2. Your products and operations minimize or even reverse resource depletion and minimize or offset environmental impacts;
    3. Your product leans towards consumer staples and not discretionary, so they sell well in most any economic environment.

If an incubator member is executing successfully on these top-line fundamentals or shows strong potential to do so, Basecamp InQb8r may be open to investing.

The process is to become a member, learn how to build in these top line fundamentals through our content, start executing, and then as the startup shows progress and success, they may become a candidate for funding.  If a startup is not yet executing on these top line fundamentals but believes they have strong potential to do so, they can still apply for funding.

Additional details about how I operate as an investor are as follows:

  1. Patient capital.  When I take on a startup, my goal is to partner with the company by becoming an owner operator.  I invest my time, expertise, technology and small amounts of my own cash to help prove out the opportunity.   If larger funding amounts are needed, I work with other investors to help fund the startup.  Ideally, I look to take on one startup every 12-18 months, which gives me the flexibility to really work on an opportunity and not feel pressured to deploy capital if I had a fund.
  2. Prove out the opportunity.  I like to test before I seek investment, which means that at the start, I will apply my expertise to help the startup prove out their product and marketing, and get a baseline for the customer acquisition metrics.  I am looking to take out as much risk as possible so that if/when I need to secure funding, I can do so at a more favorable valuation.
  3. Overhead.  Jeff Bezos is famous for saying that “your margin is my opportunity”.  I’ve modified this principle a bit and believe that “your overhead is my opportunity”, which means that I am hyper focused on operating and growing as cheap as possible.  I know from experience that being vigilant with keeping costs in check can dramatically increase the flexibility, staying power and patience to win out in the long-term, not to mention helping deliver on EBIDTA goals. Given my experience building companies and the tools, technology and processes that I have built, I think I am pretty good at knowing how to effectively manage costs and look to apply this expertise to every opportunity I take on.
  4. Maximum raise of $3 million. I like opportunities that require less than $3 million or so to achieve success based on my top line fundamentals (this is equity funding, not including debt).  Anything more and the opportunity may contain more risk than I like to take on.
  5. Niche markets.  I like opportunities that realistically cap out their revenue at around $50 mm in annual revenue.  I have found that smaller opportunities serving niche markets might have more potential to achieve my top-line fundamentals, especially a strong EBITDA. I have also found that when a consumer goods company exceeds $50 million in annual revenue, another layer of management and systems have to be added which increases complexity and costs.  If I can stay under the $50 million number, operations are much easier to manage. I am not opposed to opportunities that have potential to exceed $50 million in annual revenue, but I want to be smart and careful that growth does not add a disproportionate amount of risk versus the potential return.  In my experience as well as research, I have found that it often does not pay off.
  6. EBITDA.  My goal is to help grow and operate businesses that throw off a good net income to the owners.  A distant second goal is to realize a liquidity event through a sale of the company.  I like business I can be a part of and earn net income from over the long-term.

The funding application is only available to incubator members.

Join Now

Through Basecamp InQb8r, you get everything you need to get going right now, without wasting time or unnecessary expense in applications to join an accelerator, geographic moves or hiring consultants.

Please click here for frequently asked questions about the products and services offered through Basecamp InQb8r and using the platform.

Your membership expires after 1-year, which gives you ample time to absorb and integrate my material into your company.

Applicants can join for free by submitting the application below.

Testimonials From Bosses, Colleagues, Clients, Advisees, Mentees & InQb8r Members

Very high quality presentation and materials. I FEEL EMPOWERED WITH THE INFORMATION YOU PROVIDED to start off on the right track.

A.C., Idea - no company yet

I really appreciated the breakdown of phases in your growth stack. I APPRECIATED ALL OF THE POINTS ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF DIRECT MARKETING.

N.C., Idea - no company yet

I really enjoyed the content.  VERY COMPREHENSIVE AND WELL ORGANIZED.

A. T. , Juviv

This is probably the MOST USEFUL AND INFORMATIVE FEEDBACK WE HAVE RECEIVED IN THE HISTORY OF OUR BUSINESS. Your points about the price and lack of items could very well be the reason we are overlooked.

Ed’s practical, hands-on, executive leadership, time-tested methodologies, and laser-focus MAKE HIM AN INDISPENSABLE ASSET TO ANY TEAM serious about growing its brand leveraging the full capacity of the online sales and marketing channels.

F. K. , Brainetics

I so appreciate you taking your own time to offer feedback! Thank you so much for your kind response and EXCELLENT BUSINESS ADVICE!

L.B, Idea - no company yet

Wonderful speaking with you today. Thank you for taking the time to LEARN MORE ABOUT MY COMPANY AND FOR OFFERING TO SHARE YOUR KNOWLEDGE with me. I am very appreciative of the opportunity.

I’m very impressed with the amount of work you’ve put into this website. IT’S AN INVALUABLE TOOL for anyone looking to start or grow a CPG brand.

T.B, Idea - no company yet

Thanks so much for taking the time out to speak with me and BE A SOUNDING BOARD. I found the conversation incredibly helpful.

Ed’s INSIGHT TO THE MARKET PROVED INVALUABLE to us being a small start-up company with no experience.

R. B. , Nova Monda

I WAS BLOWN AWAY BY YOUR ACCURACY, as I am operating a start-up at the moment (granted we are well past start-up phase) and driving hard to achieve the metrics you set.

I’m still learning about everything you have written in the website, WHICH IS FANTASTIC AND THANKS FOR SHARING EXPERTISE ON THIS

Thank you for the feedback, Ed. VALUABLE INSIGHT AS USUAL. THANK YOUR FOR OUTLINING THIS SO CLEARLY. I will dig through and see if anything jumps out.

M. D., Candor

I’ve been studying your workbooks – Growth Approach, How COGS impacts…selling to retail, etc. YOUR CONTENT IS THE MOST INSIGHTFUL RESOURCE I’VE FOUND IN THE 18 MONTHS I’ve worked on my food company.

I’m just wrapping up the editing of our video and have to say – it’s one of my favorites. THANK YOU FOR ALL THESE GREAT INSIGHTS for the audience.

Ed is a NEW BUSINESS SAVANT CONNECTING THE DOTS in a way that drive sustainable business growth.

L. S., Launch Pad

The day Ed left to go on to other things, I SAT IN HIS EMPTY OFFICE AND CRIED.

C. S. , SSHDC, Inc.

The COMPANY PURCHASE WAS CONTINGENT ON ED coming to work for us.

T. K. , TWSN, Inc.

Ed joined our company when all we had were early product concepts and was VITAL IN HELPING GROW THE BRAND to almost $50M in consolidated revenues within 3 years.

A. M. , Fullbar

Ed’s INSTINCTS FOR LAUNCHING OUR LAST PRODUCT WERE SPOT ON and we will want his help for our next product.

W. F. , Veri Peri

Your content has been valuable to me and I MUST HAVE READ JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING YOU HAVE WRITTEN AND AM NOW RE-READING.

A. J. , Ionic Sport

WITHOUT THE KNOWLEDGE OF ED, we would not be as confident in our future.

J. A. , Idea - no company yet

Ed is a PIONEER IN THE FIELD OF BUILDING BRANDS online.

R. G., Idea - no company yet

Was INSPIRED AFTER SPEAKING WITH YOU at the pitch slam event.  We’re ramping up the online sales channel, and I knew I had to circle back to reconnect.

G.F., Remeteas

I downloaded your “Marketing Campaign Goal Metrics” spreadsheet recently. THANKS FOR MAKING USEFUL DOCS LIKE THIS AND MORE FREELY AVAILABLE!

Application Instructions

Startups and companies can join for free by submitting this application.

I do not ever share any personally identifiable or company information with anyone, but I do aggregate the other data submitted as part of my data analysis and market intelligence.

Please complete the application below.  Once received, I will review and if approved, will contact you to provide you with instructions for obtaining login credentials.

Eligibility and Requirements

  • Consumer goods startups and companies with physical products. This includes direct-to-consumer (also called business to consumer – B2C) and/or wholesale vendors (also called business to business to consumer – B2B2C);
  • Selling in Canada and/or the United States markets, or plans to sell in these markets.

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